York's State Police Barracks
This collage of images from the Gazette and Daily newspapers shows three of the building used as state police barracks in York County. They are, from left to right, The Keesey estate, known as "The Woods," 2510 East Market Street; 800 East Market Street, which served as the state police barracks twice; and 1111 East Market Street.
York Detail of "State's Finest" - The Motor Police
This image from the November 24, 1937 edition of the Gazette and Daily shows the officers assigned to the York detail of the Pennsylvania Motor Police at their substation at 800 East Market Street.
1195 Roosevelt Avenue
This Gazette and Daily image from the August 29, 1957 edition of the newspaper shows the progress of construction of the new state police barracks. This was the first building constructed specifically as a state polcie barracks in York County.

The State Police in York County

The Pennsylvania State Police was created as an executive department of state government by legislation, Senate Bill 278, signed into law by Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker on May 2, 1905. The department became the first uniformed police organization of its kind in the United States and a model for other state police agencies throughout the nation.

The State Highway Patrol was created in 1923 within the Department of Highways to enforce the vehicle laws of Pennsylvania's burgeoning highway system.

On June 29, 1937 the Pennsylvania Highway Patrol was merged with the State Police. The new department was called the Pennsylvania Motor Police. Act 52 of April 28, 1943, changed the name of the organization from the Pennsylvania Motor Police to the Pennsylvania State Police.

The above information was supplied by the Pennsylvania State Police Historical, Educational and Memorial Center

After researching the period newspapers, the staff of the Police Heritage Museum has compiled a list of the various buildings in York County that have been used to house the headquarters and officers of the state police since 1924.

Merchants' Hotel, 140 North George Street

State Highway Patrol - April 1924 to October 1924

On or about April 1, 1924, a substation of the State Highway Motor Patrol was established in York. The substation wouild be connected with the Lancaster office of the Highway Patrol. Although reports were that the local contingent would have three officers, the substation was initially established with two, Patrolman John D. Kime and Patrolman Nathaniel F. Martin.

The local headquarters of the Highway Patrol was in the Merchants' Hotel, at 140 North George Street in downtown York.

The location of the Merchants Hotel would have been about where the motel parking lot next to the Valencia building is today on North George Street.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, Tuesday, March 25, 1924 edition, page 1

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30 South Queen Street

State Highway Patrol - October 1924 to December 1924

The Thursday, October 16, 1924 edition of the Gazette and Daily contained an article with the following information:

"The headquarters of the York County sub-station of the State Highway Motor Patrol was transferred yesterday from the Merchants hotel to the Hamme boarding and rooming house, 30 South Queen Street. The change was ordered by the state highway department, Harrisburg. The station will be in charge of Corporal Nathaniel F. Martin. He will be assisted by Privates Frances M. Mathers and C. L. Leash."

30 South Queen Street still stands today and is in use as a private office building.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, October 16, 1924, Page 12

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961 North George Street

State Highway Patrol - January 1925 to May 1929

The Thursday, January 1, 1925 edition of the Gazette and Daily contained an article entitled "STATE MOTOR PATROL IN NEW QUARTERS" with the following information therein:

"The York sub-station of the Pennsylvania state motor patrol is now located at 961 North George street, North York. The change being made last evening from South Queen street. The station, which has been connected with the Bell and York Telephones, will be in charge of Corporal Nathaniel F. Martin, assisted by Patrolmen Frances M. Mathers and Coleman L. Leash.

Corporal Martin stated last night that he has received orders from the state highway department to apprehend all operators of motor vehicles operating with 1924 license tags, which were illegal after 12 o'clock last night"

The 961 North George Street building would have stood at what today is the southeast corner of George Street and Sixth Avenue in North York and would have been located in the corner of the parking lot for the St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, January 1, 1925, Page 3

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Hallam Hotel

State Police - November 1929 to February 1930

In November of 1929, the first detail of the mounted state police were assigned to patrol York County.

The state police were headquartered at the Hotel Hallam in Hallam borough, along the Lincoln Highway, and their horses were quartered in the stables of the nearby Wilson farm.

The detail was in charge of Sergeant A.F. Dahlstrom, who was assisted by Privates Williams, Nicholson and Stroman.

In February of 1930, it was determined that the location in Hallam was not suitable, and a location closer to York was sought. The state police were relocated from the Hallam Hotel to the state police barracks at Eighteenth and Herr Streets in Harrisburg until a more suitable location was found.

We have identified the Hotel Hallam, or the Hellam Hotel, to be the building currently located at 100 West Market Street in Hallam.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, November 20, 1929, Page 10
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, February 7, 1930, Page 1

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1400 West Market Street

State Highway Patrol - May 1929 to c. September 1931
State Police - April 1930 to June 1931

In May of 1929, the state highway patrol relocated their sub-station to the Martin-Parry cafeteria building at 1400 West Market Street.

In April of 1930, a contingent of the state police returned to York and were quartered in the same building with the highway patrol. This was the first location that both agencies were quartered in together. The local state police sub-station was closed in June of 1931 due to a shortage of troopers in Harrisburg.

An article in the April 21, 1930 edition of the Gazette and Daily mentions that checkers is the game of choice between the highway patrolmen and the state police troopers, with "Bill" Kasparvich from the state police and "Ernie" Korman from the highway patrol battling for bragging rights most evenings.

1400 West Market Street is now occupied by the West York Inn.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 2, 1929, Page 6
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 3, 1929, Page 1
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, March 29, 1930, Page 1
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, April 1, 1930, Page 1
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, April 21, 1930, Page 6
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 26, 1931, Page 1

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90 North Newberry Street

State Highway Patrol - c. September 1931 to September 1933

Several months prior to January 1932, the sub-station of the state highway patrol was relocated to the Y.M.C.A. building at 90 North Newberry Street.

The highway patrolmen had an office and four sleeping rooms at the Y.M.C.A. Highway patrolmen were on duty 24 hours a day.

The officers assigned to the York sub-station at the beginning of 1932 were Corporal John D. Kime, and Patrolmen G.E. Goodhart, G.J. Sweeney and J.G. Groff. All of their travel was conducted on motorcycles.

By mid-1933 the state was looking to relocate the sub-station for the highway patrol. They felt that the sub-station should be located somewhere along the Lincoln Highway, allegedly to make them more visible. There was also a concern that women, especially unescorted women, felt uncomfortable entering the Y.M.C.A. to go to the sub-station, due to the "character of the building".

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, January 6, 1932, pages 1 and 6
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, September 8, 1933, Page 1

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819 East Market Street

State Highway Patrol - September 1933 to September 1934

In September of 1933, the sub-station of the highway patrol was moved to 819 East Market Street.

In August of 1934, Corporal John D. Kime was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and was placed in charge of both the York and Lancaster sub-stations of the highway patrol. Kime was one of the first men to join the highway patrol upon its inception, and had been in command of the York sub-station for the previous eight years. Kime kept his headquarters at the York sub-station, which had recently been outfitted with a short-wave police radio set. Acting Corporal Arthur Ditchfield was named as the new commander of the York sub-station.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, September 16, 1933, Page 1
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, August 1, 1934, Page 7

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821 East Market Street

State Highway Patrol - September 1934 to March 1936

In September of 1934, the state highway patrol moved next door to 821 East Market Street. The building, recently vacated by Dr. C.L. Lammey, provided more room than the previous sub-station at 819 East Market Street.

With the additional space, two more highway patrolmen were added to the York sub-station in 1934, bringing the contingent up to five patrolmen, one corporal, and Sergeant Kime in charge of both the York and Lancaster sub-stations.

The building still stands today as a private residence.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, September 7, 1934, Page 1
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, January 4, 1935, Page 10

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800 East Market Street

State Highway Patrol/Pennsylvania Motor Police - April 1936 to June 1938

In April of 1936, the highway patrol moved to 800 East Market Street. The building, which was owned by the Schazberger estate, was remodeled and a garage was erected at the rear of the property. This once again provided additional room for the sub-station.

In June of 1937, the highway patrol and the state police were merged into a new agency, known as the Pennsylvania Motor Police.

John D. Kime would become a Lieutenant in the motor police, the commanding officer of the details from York to Bedford. Sergeant A.H. Shuller would be in charge of the York-Gettysburg district, and Corporal G.J. Sweeney would be in charge of the York sub-station, supervising five patrolmen.

The motor police left this building in June of 1938.

SOURCE: The York Daily, March 19, 1936, Page 7
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, November 24, 1937, Page 5

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1111 East Market Street

June 1938 to April 1940

In June of 1938, the motor police relocated to 1111 East Market Street, on the northeast corner of Market and Lehman Streets. The building, formerly known as the Carlton Hoff property, was owned by the Western National Bank.

The property provided plenty of office and living space, a large dining room for the officers, and a ten-car garage.

In January of 1940, Western National Bank sold the property to Mrs. Beulah D. VanHorn of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. VanHorn planned to convert the building into a tea room and tourist home.

Mrs. VanHorn was expected to take possession of the property on April 15, 1940. The motor patrol would have to find a new home.

The building, somewhat modified from its original design, currently houses the Etzweiler Funeral Home.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 15, 1938, Page 5
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 16, 1938, Page 7
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, January 24, 1940, Page 2

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2510 East Market Street

April 1940 to September 1946

In April of 1940, the motor police relocated to "The Woods", at 2510 East Market Street. The building, built in 1906 by the late Horace Keesey, contained 33 rooms. The building was leased from the Keesey estate.


In April of 1943, Act 52 resulted in the Pennsylvania Motor Police being renamed as the Pennsylvania State Police.

In 1946, local restauranteur Joe Lo Piccolo purchased "The Woods" from the Keesey estate, and planned to convert the building into a restaurant and hotel. The state police would be once again looking for a new home. Tentative arrangements had been made to purchase the building at 315 East Market Street, but the price of the building had risen since the first arrangements had been made when the owners received a higher counter-offer.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, March 27, 1940, Page 2
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 2, 1946, Page 26
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, July 30, 1938, Page 4

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2301 East Market Street

September 1946 to September 1952

In August of 1946, state police had reached an agreement to use the residence at 2301 East Market Street as the new state police barracks. The barracks was moved to this location in September of 1946.

In October of 1951, the property at 2301 East Market Street was listed for sale by the owner, Wesley G. Mock, as the property was in a prime commercial location. In May of 1952, the state polcie were given notice to vacate the property by the end of the month. The state polcie were unable to meet that deadline, and were given an indefinite extension of time to locate a new barracks.

In 1955, well after the state police had vacated the building, the new owners moved the building to build a service station on the property.

The building still stands today as an apartment house at 15 North Royal Street.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, August 21, 1946, Page 3
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, September 27, 1946, Page 3
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, October 15, 1951, Page 26
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 13, 1952, Page 4
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 11, 1952, Page 2
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, March 25, 1955, Page 2

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800 East Market Street

October 1952 to December 1957

In October of 1952, the state police returned to the previous home of the state highway patrol at 800 East Market Street. The building was still owned by the Schazberger estate.

A restricted parking area was established on South Sherman Street next to the barracks for the public to park while at the barracks, as state polcie vehicles would be using the parking lot to the rear of the building.

By 1954, the state police found the facility to be inadequate. Besides the parking issue, the building suffered from poor ventilation and lack of space. The building was in a rundown condition compared to other barracks throughout the state. A new home for the York barracks was desperately needed.

In 1957, after the state police moved to their new barracks, this building was demolished to build a new bank building on this site.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, September 17, 1952, Page 4
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, December 8, 1954, Pages 1 and 26
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, December 18, 1957, Page 3

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The Pottery Hill Site

Purchased December 1954, never used, sold July 1956

In December of 1954, the state General Authority purchased a 3.56 acre tract on the Lincoln Highway from the J.E. Baker estate. The property, located on the north side of the highway between Pfaltzgraff's Pottery Hill property and a John Deere dealership, had a frontage of about 350 feet, and was between 300 and 400 feet deep to the right-of-way of the Western Maryland Railroad. The land was purchased for $11,400.

Preliminary plans for the site included accomodations for 16 troopers, an interrogation room, which was not available at the 800 East Market Street building, and a driver testing facility. $220,000 had been allocated to build the one-story barracks with an attached garage.

In May of 1955, new state police commissioner Earl J. Henry decided that the location should be moved closer to the Harrisburg-Baltimore expressway and the state highway sheds on the Susquehanna Trail. Several sites north of the city were being considered.

After a new site was selected, the Pottery Hill site was sold by the state's General Authority at auction to George W. Eppley, a used car dealer at 2401 West Market Street, for $16,000.

The parcel was located in what is now known as the 3100 block of West Market Street. Businesses now located on the parcel include Markle Mower and Pacific Pride.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, December 8, 1954, Pages 1 and 26
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, January 12, 1955, Page 2
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 14, 1955, Page 2
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, July 27, 1956, Page 4

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1195 Roosevelt Avenue

December 1957 to November 1993

In May of 1955, Commissioner Henry said he was interested in a seven acre tract of land owner by the fedreal government along Roosevelt Avenue adjacent to the Yorktown Homes development in York City. Benefits to the tract included an existing sewer system, and the land was relatively flat, unlike the Pottery Hill tract.

By November of 1955, the state had agreed to purchase the tract of land from the federal government for $30,000. York's Mayor-elect Fred Schiding and the York city council objected to the state acquiring the property. The deed to the property was transferred to the state's General Authority in June of 1956.

In July of 1956, The Ballinger Company, a Philadelphia firm that would be the architects and engineers for the new barracks, announced details of the new building. The facility would consist of the substation, garage and a driver's examination course to the rear of the building. The state police moved into their new barracks in December of 1957. This was the first building in York County specifically built for the state police.

By 1992, the size of the state police contingent in York County had grown, and the distance of the barracks from Interstate 83 was beginning to become an issue due to the time it took troopers to travel U.S. Route 30 from the barracks to the Interstate. The state solicited proposals for a new barracks location.

1195 Roosevelt Avenue still stands today, and is used as a counseling center.

SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 14, 1955, Page 2
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, May 21, 1955, Page 4
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, November 21, 1955, Page 4
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 14, 1956, Pages 3 and 42
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, June 16, 1956, Page 30
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, July 28, 1956, Page 4
SOURCE: The Gazette and Daily, December 3, 1957, Page 4

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110 North Street, Loganville

November 1993 to July 2018

Two review boards examined the proposed sites for the new state polcie barracks, and selected a 2.6 acre site on the Loganville-Springfield Elementary School property, just off of the Loganville exit of Interstate 83. The new barracks would not include a drivers examination area.

Final approvals for the new barracks were received in May of 1993. The 8,700 square foot building, with 93 parking spaces, would coist $575,000.

The state police moved into their new barracks in November of 1993. The address would eventually be changed to 110 Trooper Court.

This building is vacant and available as of September of 2019.

SOURCE: The York Daily Record, August 25, 1992, Page 9
SOURCE: The York Daily Record, March 19, 1993, Page 11
SOURCE: The York Daily Record, May 4, 1993, Pages 1 and 12
SOURCE: The York Daily Record, November 1, 1993, Page 7

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101 North Main Street, Loganville

July 2018 to present

After 25 years, the state police outgrew their previous barracks at 110 Trooper Court. Staffing at the barracks had increased, and a larger facility was needed.

A new, 15,440 square foot building would be constructed at 101 North Main Street in Loganville, next door to the Loganville-Springfield Elementary school. The enlarged facility allowed space for specialty services such as Megan's Law troopers, vice, forensics, and evidence storage.

Troopers moved into thei new barracks in July of 2018.

This building is the current home of the York barracks.

SOURCE: New state police barracks in Loganville set to open July 2018, YDR.com October 12, 2017

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The Police Heritage Museum, Inc.

Address: P.O. Box 1582
  York, PA 17405
Phone: (717) 845-COPS
E-mail: Contact Form

About Us

The Police Heritage Museum, Inc. is entirely run by volunteers - there is no paid staff working for the museum.

We ask for your patience when contacting the Police Heritage Museum, as there is no full-time staff to immediately respond to any inquiries.